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What is the Difference Between Cornice and Coving?

What is the Difference Between Cornice and Coving?

In general, cornice is a more ornate and elaborate moulding than coving. While the terms ‘cornice’ and ‘coving’ are often used interchangeably, there is a subtle difference between the two.

Coving is a type of cornice that is typically uniform in profile. It is sometimes made from plaster and wood, but more often from high grade polymer, and low grade polymers; it is generally small, plain, and linear. Coving is a popular choice for modern homes, as it can add a touch of elegance without being too overwhelming.

Cornice is a general term for a decorative moulding that is used to create a finished look between walls and ceilings. It can be made from a variety of materials, including plaster, wood, and metal. Cornice can be simple or ornate, and it can be transforming a room. Usually, cornice is often used in traditional homes, while coving is more common in modern homes. However, there are no fixed rules, and both terms can be used to describe a variety of decorative mouldings.

The use of cornices dates to ancient Greece. In Greek architecture, cornices were used to create a finished look between the walls and the roof. They were often made of stone or terracotta, and they were decorated with intricate pattens and carvings. The use of cornices continued in both Egyptian and Roman architecture, and they became even more elaborate. Roman cornices were often decorated with statues and other objects. After the Roman empire, the use of cornices declined throughout the Medieval and Middle Ages, but they returned during the Renaissance becoming more elaborate and ecclesiastical. In the Classical era cornices were typically decorated with complex designs, including scrolls, flowers, animals, and other motifs. This continued throughout the Victorian Era but changed to become more subtle throughout the Edwardian Era, evolving into the geometric Art Deco Style. After the second world war, new materials such as High Grade Polymers were introduced, bringing cornice to a wider market.

Coving and Cornice are not exclusively used for decorative purposes. They also served a practical function, as they helped distinguish a difference between wall and ceiling, they hide the natural crack line between ceiling and wall, and they will add value to your home.

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